November 10, 2015


Wow, it's been almost a year since I last blogged.  It wasn't intentional to take such a lengthy break, it just kind of happened that way.  I have been posting on my Facebook page, occasionally in the meantime, but not with any regularity.  I also love using Instagram, although my posts tend to be mainly of our cats!

There has been crafty stuff going on, a bit of teaching and writing to be precise.  I have spent some time doing workshops with Primary School kids at my sons school, and out of all the projects I did with them, the wet felting has to have been the most successful.  They had great fun doing it, its messy but its just warm water and soap messy, and we always seemed to gather a bit of an audience of the other kids wanting to know what we were doing.

We made balls, basically the easiest thing to do if you wanted to give it a try.  The fibers I used were given to me by Coats Crafts UK (I used to work for them!), and is called Filz-it. 

The kids did really well considering none of them had done it before.  Wet felting to make balls can be tricky as it requires lots of patience, if you rush the process, the ball won't be matted enough to stay as a ball and will break open as it dries.

Lots more to blog about soon, including a book and Alpacas (all will be revealed!) and a small sewing tutorial.

1 comment:

NagaRaj Raj said...

They had a fabulous time doing it, its chaotic however its simply warm water and cleanser untidy, and we generally appeared to accumulate a touch of a group of people of alternate children needing to realize what we were doing. My name is Nagaraj I'm working in this website My opinion is Wet felting to make balls can be dubious as it requires bunches of patience.The stitch side is very much clarified and the examples are reviewed for trouble so anybody from learner to cutting edge will discover a task to suit them. You can undoubtedly modify the size of your flying creature by utilizing thicker fleece and a bigger snare as well.